Monday, October 25, 2021

Art in the Age of the Internet

 

Art in the Age if the Instagram featuring Jia Jia Fei
ART IN THE AGE OF THE INTERNET

The internet and social media have changed the way that we go to, and experience, exhibitions in galleries and museums (and large monuments as well). People often visit these spaces not just to experience the works of art, but often with the express purpose of recording where they have been.

In a way, this can take something away from the intentions of the artists and curators– because one is able to curate their own “online museum” on Instagram that can be a very highly mediated experience with a particular point-of-view (that may have little to do with the original intentions).

The firsthand experience of viewing is often mediated by the digital apparatus (your phone or camera), and the intention is to post it to mark that you were there, but also for it to be seen and experienced by your followers. 

Therefore, while you are there in person experiencing the original works of art, you may be looking at them largely through the lens of your camera or the screen of your phone. Think about the ramifications of the theories posited by Walter Benjamin in "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction."

Art in the Age of Internet (26m 46s. The first segment deals with Art in the Age of the Internet):

Amalia Ulman. Excellencies & Perfections #2 (2018)

Some artists create works of art that intentionally reference the internet and social media, and often the system of surveillance that they embody. These types of social critique are often intended to make us aware of our complicity in these very systems, and are often meant to leave us uncomfortable about our role in this system.

What one posts online can embody ideas about the way that we see ourselves, or the way that we want to be seen, and about the way in which we create these constructed mediations.

These idealized and mediated expressions of self are created to be consumed online, and are often fictionalized accounts of the “reality” that the spectator is meant to understand as “real”– but they are often actually more irreal than they are real. 

They also serve as raw source material for artists who use these types of mediated images to engage in a larger cultural critique.

Amalia Ulman (shown above) is an artist who created a body of work where she pretended to be an Instagram influencer, and her online performance helps underscore and contextualize the way in which the epoch of social media sharing and over-sharing has become a normalized way to consume online content. It also points out the extent to which Instagram feeds should be understood as fictionalized accounts of "reality."

See Also:


The Art History of the Selfie (8m):
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. Surface Tension. 1992 (Installation)

Some artists, such as Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, deal with the exploration of the systems of surveillance, and our complicity in those systems when we surf the internet.

Surface Tension "is an interactive installation where an image of a giant human eye follows the observer with Orwellian precision.This work was inspired by a reading of Georges Bataille's text The Solar Anus during the first Gulf War: first wide-spread deployment of camera-guided 'intelligent bombs'. Present-day computerised surveillance techniques employed by the Department of Homeland Security in the United States through the Patriot Act, provide a new and distressing backdrop for this piece."
See Surface Tension videos HERE.

Eva Respini: Art in the Age of the Internet Talk:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27u6a-kKl6I

Art in the Age of the Internet Exhibition:
https://www.icaboston.org/exhibitions/art-age-internet-1989-today
https://www.icaboston.org/video/art-age-internet-1989-today
https://umma.umich.edu/exhibitions/2018/art-in-the-age-of-the-internet-1989-to-today
Art in the Age of Internet (26m 46s. The first segment deals with Art in the Age of the Internet):
https://www.pbs.org/video/art-in-the-age-of-the-internet-playwright-claudia-rankine-wukk6b

WEEK 5 (October 28): Art in the Age of Internet

• Jeff Scheible: Longing to Connect: Cinema’s Year of OS Romance

• Katrina Sluis, Julian Stallabrass and Christiane Paul. The Canon After the Internet
• Lauren Cornell. Self-Portraiture in the First-Person Age 
• Gloria Sutton. CTRL ALT DELETE: The Problematics of Post-Internet Art
• Jeffrey De Blois. Hybrid Bodies 

An exploration of the ways in which the advent of the internet and social media has shifted the way that we engage with art, and how it has transformed the way that artists think about, and make art. 

Carrie Mae Weems: Can an artist Inspire Social Change?

Thursday, October 14, 2021

Researching and Writing a Formal Research Paper

UCSB Library Art 1A Research Page:


http://guides.library.ucsb.edu/art1a

Chizu Morihara (Art & Architecture Librarian):
cmorihara@ucsb.edu
(805) 893-2766

Paper Format (PAPER TOPIC HERE)
- 8 pages of text (this does NOT include the cover page, bibliography or images) 

- Double-spaced 

- Cover page 

- Footnotes or endnotes 

- Bibliography 

- Images (in a separate document at the end of the paper) 

- Use at least 8 different research sources (including peer reviewed 
journal articles, books, exhibition catalogs, monographs, etc.) 

- Use at least 10 citations 


- Upload an electronic copy of your paper (HERE) to the plagiarism scan in a WORD document (without pictures) and give your Teaching Assistant a hardcopy with pictures.

QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF WHEN WRITING & EDITING YOUR PAPER:

1) Do I have the proper number of citations and sources?

2) Did I properly format my citations using MLA or Chicago?

3) Do I have a properly formatted formal bibliography?

4) Did I adhere to the proper paper length?

5) Do I have a clear, and specific thesis statement?

6) Does my thesis statement specifically relate to the final draft of my paper?

7) Did I run spell check (repeatedly)?

8) Did I carefully edit to make sure that I used proper grammar, and were my tenses consistent?

9) Did I formulate clear arguments and substantiate all of my claims with clear and concrete examples?

10) Did I avoid sweeping generalizations and vague assertions?

11) Did I use casual colloquial language in my formal research paper? If so, find more precise ways to describe the point being made.

12) Did I use scholarly research sources such as peer-reviewed journal articles, scholarly articles and books rather than sources such as blogs, Wikipedia, encyclopedias etc (that are not acceptable sources for a formal research paper).

13) Did I properly cite quotes and summaries of other people's intellectual property (footnotes and in-text citations)?

14) Did I avoid excessive biographical information about the artist? Instead I should only include biographical information that is directly relevant to their artistic practice.

15) Would anyone reading my paper understand what I am trying to convey, or do I need to more clearly define the scope of my research and ultimately the point of my paper?

16) Did I place the pictures at the end of my paper? If I embedded them in the text, I need to remove them and place them at the end of my paper.

17) Did I remember to remove the pictures from the electronic draft of my paper that I uploaded to the plagiarism scan?

18) Did I remember to upload my paper to the plagiarism scan (HERE), and give a hard copy to my Teaching Assistant (with the pictures)?

19) Did I remember to put my name, perm number and section time on my paper?

20) Did I remember to frequently save, backup and email drafts of my paper to myself (just in case my computer crashes)?

21) When I had questions, or needed help, did I reach out to my TA, professor or CLAS?


GENERAL TIPS ON WRITING YOUR PAPER:

1) The selection of a good thesis and supporting examples is an important part of producing a good paper. Be selective. The paper is about how to look closely at works of art and how your evaluation of objects and images is expanded by the specific context in which they are presented.

2) Write primarily with nouns and verbs. Avoid unnecessary (especially vague and imprecise) adjectives and adverbs.

3) Revise and rewrite. Proofread your work. Do not rely solely on "spell check."



4) Use the dictionary to refer to words you do not fully understand.

5) Do not overstate, or excessively use qualifiers (such as very, rather, little, etc.). 



6) Use orthodox diction and accurate spelling. ("Its" is possessive; "It's" is a contraction for "it is," "Its' " doesn't exist. "Their" is possessive, "They're" is a contraction of "they are," There is declarative).

7) Be clear. Make references clearly. (Do not use the word "this" as the subject of a sentence).

8) Do not let your opinions get in the way of your writing.

9) Avoid using Wikipedia, blogs, newspaper articles and other materials that are not scholarly. These ARE NOT research materials for a formal research paper.

10) Get to the point quickly. Concentrate on quality of writing not quantity of words.

11) For help with formatting MLA and Chicago citations, visit Purdue Owlhttps://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

For help writing the paper contact CLAS at 893-3269. They have a writing lab that will help you with papers, and will even proofread your papers. They also offer help specifically to students for whom English is a second language. CLAS site: http://www.clas.sa.ucsb.edu/

Thursday, October 7, 2021

Scholarly Research Training Workshop on Tuesday, October 19

WHAT: Art 1A Scholarly Research Training Workshop

WHOChizu Morihara

WHENTuesday, October 19 from 12:30-1:45 (in class)


Writing a formal research paper requires finding appropriate scholarly articles, peer-reviewed journal articles and books. Sources such as blogs, newspaper articles, unauthorized websites, random papers uploaded to the internet, random YouTube videos, Wikipedia and encyclopedias (including Grove Art Online) 
are not appropriate resources to cite in formal research papers.

Your research materials should largely be procured from Davidson Library, and you will note that Chizu Morihara, our Art & Architecture Librarian, has created a special page for Art 1A Visual Literacy.

Art 1A Visual Literacy Library Homepage:

Other Helpful Library Resources:

Monday, August 2, 2021

Welcome to Art 1A: Visual Literacy Fall Quarter 2021

Hello everyone,

Welcome to Art 1A: Visual Literacy, and to UCSB for all of our new students. I hope that you are all safe, healthy and doing well during the Covid-19 pandemic. I know that this is definitely a difficult time to go to school, but I wanted to assure you that we are here to help you. Art 1A: Visual Literacy is a safe and inclusive class, and your presence and opinions are valued.

I wanted to reach out to let you know that everything that you need to know about Art 1A will be posted here on the Art 1A website, not on GauchoSpace. However, your Teaching Assistants will likely be using GauchoSpace for some aspects of their sections. Please read everything carefully, I will go over everything in class when we meet, and I will answer any questions that you may have.

Art 1A lectures will be taught synchronously via Zoom, and your discussion sections will be taught in-person. The lectures not will be recorded and therefore, you will need to attend during all of the scheduled meeting times. If you have time conflicts with work, or with other classes, then you should take Art 1A another quarter. Your discussion sections will not have a Zoom component available, and if you are taking this class you must attend the sections in person during your assigned time.

Please fill out the Art 1A Questionnaire (HERE), and return it to me and your TA ASAP. This will help us get to know you, and it will also let us know whether you are having any technology issues. You can find our contact information HERE.

Here is the course reader and the book that we will be using (please have them in your possession before class meets for the first time):
1) The Course Reader is only available from Associated Students. You can either purchase a physical copy HERE or an eReader HERE. The physical copy is available, starting September 20, at the Associated Student Ticket Office. Location Information and Hours HERE.

Add the eReader ($28.80) to your bag and then follow the prompts to check out, or you can click on the image above and it will take you to the Associated Students e-Store for your reader. Typically once you buy the reader you should receive your copy via email within 24-48 hours (purchases are final). There will also be hardcopies of the reader available. eReader Purchase link: https://shop.as.ucsb.edu/Art-1A-Fall-2021-E-Reader-p393834402

2) John Berger's Ways of Seeing is available from the Campus Bookstore and Amazon (Click HERE and HERE).
4) The Course Syllabus can be found HERE.
5) The Calendar, where your weekly reading and writing assignments are located, can be found HERE.
6) The Research Paper prompt can be found HERE.
7) The UCSB Library Art 1A Research Page can be found HERE.
9) View the UCSB policy about Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism, furnishing false information, unauthorized collaboration and misuse of course materials) HERE.
10) The UCSB Diversity Statement can be found HERE and the University of California Diversity Statement can be found HERE.
11) The UCSB Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) contact information can be found HERE.
12) The UCSB Health and Wellness website can be found HERE.

Friday, July 2, 2021

ART 1A EXTRA ASSIGNMENTS TO CLEAR UNEXCUSED ABSENCES FOR SUMMER SESSION A

If you have missed a lot of classes, it is a good idea to check with your TA to see how many unexcused absences you have accumulated. As you know, 3 or more unexcused absences will result in failing the class. However, if you had emergencies, and can provide me with a note from your doctor, from Student Health, or from your CAPS, DSP, CARE Counselor (for the specific dates in question)– then those absences will be excused.

If you still have a lot of absences, then you can clear up to 3 absences by submitting up to three of the assignments listed below (one assignment clears a single absence) (Due by Saturday, July 31 by 2:00PM PT).

Watch one of the recorded Arts Colloquium Talks found here, and write a 1-2 page Artist Talk response:

1) Polymode Colloquium Artist Talk: Recorded Talk

2) Tia-Simone Gardner Colloquium Talk: Recorded Talk

3) Nick Crockett Colloquium Talk: Recorded Talk

Monday, June 14, 2021

Welcome to Art 1A Summer Session A

 Hello everyone,

Welcome to Art 1A: Visual Literacy, and to UCSB for all of our new students. I hope that you are all safe, healthy and doing well during the Covid-19 pandemic. I know that this is definitely a difficult time to go to school, particularly remotely, but I wanted to assure you that we are here to help you. Art 1A: Visual Literacy is a safe and inclusive class, and your presence and opinions are valued.

I wanted to reach out to let you know that everything that you need to know about Art 1A will be posted here on the Art 1A website, not on GauchoSpace. Please read everything carefully, I will go over everything in class when we meet, and I will answer any questions that you may have.

I will be teaching the class synchronously during the T/R 1:00-2:55 lecture times, and your discussion sections will also be taught synchronously. Neither the lectures, nor the sections will be recorded– therefore, you will need to attend during all of the scheduled meeting times. If you have time conflicts with work, or with other classes, then you should take Art 1A another quarter. If you are in a different time zone, please let me and your TA know. Teaching Assistants: Alina Kawai and Kate Saubstre.

Please fill out the Art 1A Questionnaire (HERE), and return it to me and your TA ASAP. This will help us get to know you, and it will also let us know whether you are having any technology issues. You can find our contact information HERE.

Here is the course reader and the book that we will be using (please have them in your possession before class meets for the first time):
1) The Course Reader ($20.00) is only available from Associated Students. Add the reader to your bag and then follow the prompts to check out, or you can click on the image above and it will take you to the Associated Students e-Store for your reader. Typically once you buy the reader you should receive your copy via email within 24-48 hours (purchases are final). 

Here is the place to purchase it (or simply click on the "add to card" above and that will direct you to Associated Students): https://shop.as.ucsb.edu/Art-1A-Summer-Session-A-2021-p367055762

2) John Berger's Ways of Seeing is available from the Campus Bookstore and Amazon (Click HERE and HERE).
4) The Course Syllabus can be found HERE.
5) The Calendar, where your weekly reading and writing assignments are located, can be found HERE.
6) The Research Paper prompt can be found HERE.
7) The UCSB Library Art 1A Research Page can be found HERE.
9) View the UCSB policy about Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism, furnishing false information, unauthorized collaboration and misuse of course materials) HERE.
10) The UCSB Diversity Statement can be found HERE and the University of California Diversity Statement can be found HERE.
11) The UCSB Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) contact information can be found HERE.
12) The UCSB Health and Wellness website can be found HERE.